More than 4 million people in the U.S. have tested positive for the coronavirus and more than 150,000 have died. Though growth in new cases slowed in late spring, by mid-June new cases began to trend upward nationally.

In the graphics below, explore the trend in new cases in your state to see whether cases are rising, falling or staying level. You can view the data via a heat map (immediately below), a curve chart and a table with details on each state’s case trends over the last three weeks. Or to see states’ total cases and deaths on a map.

The following chart displays states’ trends in new daily case counts, total cases, and per capita totals. To compare state outbreaks, the trend lines for average new daily cases are graphed against each state’s total case count to date. This highlights a state’s daily growth relative to the overall size of its outbreak.

When both new and total case counts grow quickly, the curve bends upward. As cases slow, the curve levels or bends down. In New York, site of the country’s largest outbreak, the state’s curve rose sharply before reaching over 170,000 total cases in April. Since then, new cases have fallen from about 10,000 per day in mid-April to under 800 per day in mid July.

Conversely, Florida peaked around 1,200 new cases per day on average in April, only to surge again to nearly 12,000 per day in mid-July.

Coronavirus case totals are much greater in some states than others. In the spring, a large share of U.S. cases were centered around New York City. As of mid July, other large, populous states such as California, Florida and Texas have reached high totals as well. Some other states such as Arizona and Louisiana show a heavy burden of infection relative to their population size.

Explore the map below to see totals and per capita figures around the country for both cases and deaths.

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